Livestock and Poultry

Are you interested in raising animals as a farm enterprise?

New Entry's livestock and poultry programs are designed to help farmers of varying experience levels profitably and sustainably raise and sell meat, eggs, milk, and fiber, with an emphasis on pasture-based systems.

New Entry partners with the Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine to host a series of Livestock and Poultry Field Schools covering poultry, sheep, goats, swine, and beef cattle. These workshops offer hands-on practical skills training, with topics ranging from animal health and nutrition to regulations and meat marketing.

We also work to help small-scale poultry farmers find legal, affordable poultry processing options. New Entry manages the Eastern Massachusetts Mobile Poultry Processing Unit (MPPU) and provides training and regulatory and technical assistance for on-farm poultry processing in Massachusetts, New England and beyond.

For more information on New Entry's livestock and poultry programs, contact the New Entry office at 978-654-6745.

 

Livestock and Poultry Resources

Building an On-farm Poultry Processing Facility

Media:

  • Digital Download

We've learned a lot over the last few years while planning, building, operating, repairing, and managing a mobile poultry processing unit. Drawing on our own experiences and those of other poultry processing projects around the country, we put together this comprehensive guide to planning and constructing an MPPU or stationary facility for on-farm poultry processing.

The guide incorporates tips and lessons learned, case studies and example plans, and lots guidance for anyone thinking about building their own MPPU or other on-farm poultry processing facility, including:

  • Choosing a facility type
  • Selecting equipment
  • Designing a floor plan

For questions about the guide, please contact the New Entry office at 978-654-6745.

Handbook for Small-Scale Poultry Producer-Processors

Media:

  • Digital Download

New Entry prepared a Handbook for Small-Scale Poultry Producer-Processors that describes how to apply for licensure to process poultry using a Massachusetts-inspected MPPU. Producers are encouraged to use the guide to understand basic requirements for MPPU use and licensure. The guide contains:

  • Overview of Massachusetts regulations regarding poultry processing
  • Frequently asked questions (FAQs)
  • Step-by-Step guidance on completing the Mass Slaughter License application
  • What to expect after completing the application
  • Regulatory Resources

For questions or clarification about the Handbook, or for technical assistance in completing your local and state approvals for MPPU use, please contact the New Entry office at 978-654-6745.

 

Mobile Poultry Processing Unit Farm & Food Safety Management Guide

Media:

  • Digital Download

A guide for small-scale poultry producers and processors using a Massachusetts-inspected mobile poultry processing unit (MPPU) or stationary on-farm facility. The guide was created by New Entry in partnership with the New England Small Farm Institute with input from Massachusetts state agencies, outlining the food safety and recordkeeping practices required of small-scale poultry processors operating under a slaughter license from the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, including:

  • On-farm processing safe food handling plan
  • Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs)
  • Standard Operating and Sanitation Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs and SSOPs)
  • Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) Plan
  • Sample Daily Use Report Logs for Massachusetts poultry processors

For questions or clarification about the Handbook, or for technical assistance in completing your local and state approvals for MPPU use, please contact the New Entry office at 978-654-6745.

Summary of Results: New England Small Ruminant Producer Survey

Media:

  • Digital Download

The New England Small Ruminant Working Group created and distributed a survey of New England sheep and goat farmers in order to better understand two questions:

  1. What are the most pressing IPM challenges for New England small ruminant producers?
  2. What is the scope of these challenges?

The survey also aimed to provide a better understanding of New England sheep and goat farmers' knowledge and adoption of IPM practices to address these challenges, especially related to internal parasites.

This document serves as a report on the state of IPM challenges and practices among New England small ruminant producers, summarizing survey results and incorporating the input and recommendations of Working Group members, including veterinarians, Extension and other farm service providers, and several sheep and goat farmers.

Written by Sam Anderson (Livestock Program Coordinator, New Entry Sustainable Farming Project). Support from the Northeastern IPM Center

A Guide to Raising Pigs

Media:

  • Book

This guide offers illustrated information about every aspect of pig raising. Some topics covered include:

  • Choosing the right breeds
  • Feeding and housing
  • Health maintenance and disease prevention
  • Breeding
  • Butchering and pork processing
  • Fitting and showing
  • Pig raising as a business

Author: Kelly Klober

1997

ABC's of Pasture Grazing

Media:

  • Book

Learn the basic for achieving a well-managed pasture through plant and animal knowledge, identification of your goals, some equipment, and practice.

LPES

 

An Entrepreneur's Guide to Farming in Massachusetts

Media:

  • Digital Download

Are you thinking of starting a farming business in Massachusetts? Are you currently farming and interested in expanding the crops you grow, accessing new marketing outlets, or making your business more profitable? This resource guide is a collection of 35 independent fact sheets that can be used separately as needed or together as a complete set. Topics include land access, farm infrastructure, risk management, business planning, livestock processing, organic certification, and much more. It may be helpful for you to use this series with someone who can guide you to more farming information, such as an experienced farmer, a Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources employee, a United States Department of Agriculture employee, or other service provider. 

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